Previously we’ve spoken about why your businesses should work with bloggers and the benefits of having them involved in your marketing and advertising campaigns. So now, we’re going to discuss how to work with bloggers and give you advice on approaching influencers in your niche. Here’s 6 tips to consider when working with bloggers.

1. Give Them A Bounty Of Information

There’s no doubt that you are passionate about your company and brand, but it’s unlikely that a blogger will be on the same level as you, at least at the beginning of the partnership. Provide them with sufficient information in different mediums so they can absorb what your business is about and channel that into the collaborative campaign. Send them a press release, high-resolution images, an information pack and a sizzle reel if you have it on hand, and be available to answer any questions that may arise. The more information, the better.

2. Don’t Expect Them To Work For Free

One of the most common mistakes that businesses make when approaching bloggers is to insinuate that the work be done for free. When working with bloggers, make sure they are not out of pocket and that there is some benefit for them, whether it be monetary, a gifted product or a complimentary service. Like any industry, never assume that the job will be done for free and always provide an incentive, otherwise they are likely to turn your proposal down.

3. Their Time Is Precious

Following on from the above, it is important to understand that bloggers either blog full-time as their sole income or as a side project to their full-time or part-time employment. Whichever the case, a blogger’s time is precious and there are many things that need to be done on a daily basis to keep a blog running smoothly, so know that their time is precious and should not be taken advantage of. Just as you wouldn’t expect someone to clean your floors for nothing, you cannot expect bloggers to cover an event or product with no incentive for their time.

4. Approach Them As The Media

Bloggers have become a crucial part of the digital media landscape, however they are often considered to be inferior to traditional media coverage. Successful bloggers have established a business etiquette and bring to the table a new set of skills and advanced means of engagement, so approach them as you would a newspaper reporter or magazine editor. The most important thing is to be respectful and never put pressure on them to promote your product – no is no.

5. Make Sure It Is Relevant

A blogger’s readers are their pride and joy. They have built up a loyal following over a period of time because of the quality content, unique voice, authenticity and relevance of their blog.  Therefore, they are very conscious about maintaining integrity and credibility and do not want to jeopardise it with a collaborative opportunity that is not relevant, informative and useful to their readers. Don’t pitch a fashion brand to a home renovation blogger, or a parenting product to a teen lifestyle blogger. You will be knocked back for not understanding the blog and it will be harder to get them on board for future campaigns.

6. Be Flexible And Give Them Creative Control

When collaborating with bloggers, be sure to give them some degree of creative control when it comes to developing a campaign. They will know what works best for their blog and their audience, so let them take the lead and you’ll be surprised by the creative concepts they can develop. It is also important to be flexible and not let your vision hinder the collaboration.

Bloggers have become crucial influencers in the digital space, so it is important for the success of your business to collaborate and build healthy, long-lasting relationships with bloggers in your industry. How you work with them is important, so be sure to consider these points when you approach a blogger and propose a collaborative opportunity. Don’t forget, their followers and unique voice are the key to your business’s success, so collaborate with them and reap the benefits.

Image sourced under creative commons.